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Amasi yoghurt starter culture | for home made yoghurt

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Amasi yoghurt, sometimes also called Amasai, is a traditional fermented yoghurt from South Africa. It is viewed as somewhat similar to milk kefir, while others think it tastes like something between cottage cheese and yogurt.

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Description

Amasi yogurt, sometimes also called Amasai, is a traditional fermented yoghurt from South Africa. Make it yourself with this Amasi starter culture

What is yoghurt?

Yoghurt, also spelled yogurt, yogourt or yoghourt, is a foodproduct produced by bacterial fermentation of milk. The bacteria used to make yoghurt are known as yoghurt cultures. Fermentation of sugars in the milk by these bacteria produces lactic acid, which acts on milk protein to give yoghurt its texture and characteristic tart flavor.  Cow’s milk is commonly available worldwide and, as such, is the milk most commonly used to make yoghurt. Milk from water buffalo, goats, ewes, mares, camels, yaks and plant milks are also used to produce yogurt. The milk used may be homogenized or not. It may be pasteurized or raw. Each type of milk and each type of starter produces substantially different results.

What is amasi?

Amasi yogurt, sometimes also called Amasai, is a traditional fermented yoghurt from South Africa. It is viewed as somewhat similar to milk kefir, while others think it tastes like something between cottage cheese and yoghurt. It has a fairly mild, slightly sharp taste.

Thermophilic ánd mesophilic

Amasi is one of the chillest yoghurt around,  as it can be prepared both mesophilic (room temperature) and thermophilic (warm, 35+ degrees). Each gives its own result.

As a fermented milk culture, it has many health benefits, including live probiotics and easily digestible nutrients from the milk (including lactose).

Also known as

  • Maas
  • Amasai

Content Amasi starter culture

  • 1 gram of heirloom mesophilic dry yoghurt starter
  • Enough for the rest of your life
  • Produced in the UK
  • Allergens: milk

Micro-organisms Amasi starter culture

Lactic acid bacteria: Lactococcus, different types of Lactobacillus, Leuconostoc and Enterococcus, Acinetobacter, Aeromonas and genera within the Enterobacteriaceae.

Why a dried starter?

  • dried starters have a long shelf life
  • easy to ship / take with you, also abroad
  • does not deteriorate due to transport
  • light in weight (shipping costs)
  • you can buy the starter even if you do not intend to make yoghurt immediately
  • you can save a part in case the quality of your fresh yoghurt deteriorates
  • after activation, the effect of dried yoghurt as a starter is identical to fresh yoghurt

Storage instructions

In the fridge or freezer. Save the dried starter in a ziploc bag after use, or vacuumsealed. The starter is highly hydrophilic – if moisture gets into the package, the quality will deteriorate. Shelf life is at least a year in the freezer, but probably longer.

How to activate your amasi yogurt starter culture

  1. Empty the starter culture package in a clean jar. Crush the flakes with a clean fork or spoon.
  2. Pour a 1/2 glass of sterilized (long-life) milk over starter, stir well and let it rest for a few minutes to rehydrate.
  3. Stir again until all pieces are dissolved. This may take a while.
  4. Cover with a piece of paper towel or a handkerchief, secured with an elastic band.
  5. Allow to mature for 48 hours at room temperature or slightly warmer. Once it thickens or after 48 hours, move it to the fridge and let it cool for about 6 hours.
  6. It is possible that the yoghurt will be a bit thin at the moment. That does not matter. The consistency will improve in the next few batches.
  7. Add the starter to a liter of sterilized (long-life) milk and stir well.
  8. Cover with a piece of paper towel or a handkerchief, secured with an elastic band.
  9. Allow to ferment for 12 to 48 hours at room temperature. Depending on the temperature and your starter, it may take 48 hours for the yoghurt to ferment completely.
  10. Let cool in the fridge for about 6 hours.
  11. You can now eat this yoghurt immediately, and keep a spoonfull  for the next batch or, preferably, frozen in ice cube bags as a “mother starter”. Each ice cube can be used as a starter for a liter of milk.

How to make amasi yoghurt

  1. From now on you can also use other types of milk: cows, sheep, goats, skimmed milk, whole milk, raw, etc. Or prepare it with cream. Note that it is difficult to make yoghurt from pasteurized milk, the texture will remain somewhat thin. Heat the milk to 90 ° C for a few minutes and let it cool down again. This gives a much a better consistency. Sterilized milk does not need to be heated.
  2. Mix an ice cube from your yogurt starter with about a liter of milk, stir several times until fully dissolved.
  3. Allow to ferment for 12-48 hours at room temperature.
  4. Cool back in the fridge.
  5. Enjoy!

Tip

  • Sometimes a dried yogurt starter needs a second ‘fermentation round’ to get it’s full potential. This means using a spoonfull of the first batch to start a second. The second batch will be better.
  • Amasi is one of the chillest yogurts around,  as it can be prepared both mesophilic (room temperature) and thermophilic (warm, 35+ degrees). Each gives its own result.

Buying a Amasi starter culture?

Order your Amasi starter culture at startercultures.eu, the European webshop for all your fermentation needs’. By Meneer Wateetons, renowned Dutch fermentation expert and author. Order on weekdays before  3 pm and we’ll ship the same day.  Questions on the usage of the vegan cheese starter kit? Ask them in our chat, we’ll here to help!

Online on demand workshop ‘how to make vegan cheese at home’ (subtitled)

During this English subtitled workshop you will learn the theory and practice of making vegan cheesevegan blue cheese starter kits at home, with a focus on vegan camembert and vegan blue cheese . Foodwriter ‘Meneer Wateetons’, author of several books on fermentation and alternative food preparation techniques,  will teach you all about fermentation, curing salts, food safety, pH, starter cultures, molds and drying conditions. Click here for more info.

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